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Glossary - Burns

| A || B || C || D || E || F || G || H || I || J || K || L || M |
| N || O || P || Q || R || S || T || U || V || W || X || Y || Z |

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B

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C

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chemical burns - burns due to strong acids or alkalines coming into contact with the skin and/or eyes.

D

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dermis - the middle layer of skin, which is made up of blood vessels, lymph vessels, hair follicles, and sweat glands.

E

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electrical burns - burns due to contact with an electrical current.

epidermis - the outer layer of skin, which is made up of the horny layer, squamous cells, and basal cells.

F

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first-degree burns (also called superficial burns) - burns that only affect the epidermis, or outer layer of skin. The burn site appears red, painful, dry, and absent of blisters. Mild sunburn is an example. Scarring is usually rare or minimal.

G

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graft - uninjured skin, which is removed from its original site and placed on the burn wound.

granulation tissue - a specialized tissue created by the body as a response to injury. It is exceedingly rich in tiny blood vessels.

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I

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N

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O

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Q

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R

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radiation burns - burns due to prolonged exposure to ultraviolet rays of the sun, or to other sources of radiation such as x-ray.

S

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second-degree burns (also called a partial thickness burn) - burns that involves the epidermis and part of the dermis layer of skin. The burn site is red, blistered and painful, with possible swelling.

skin graft - using a piece of skin from an uninjured part of the body to repair a deep skin wound.

subcutis - the deepest layer of skin; consists of collagen and fat cells.

T

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thermal burns - burns due to external heat sources which raise the temperature of the skin and tissues and cause tissue cell death or charring. Hot metals, scalding liquids, steam, and flames, when coming in contact with the skin, cause thermal burns.

third-degree burns (also called a full thickness burn) - burns that destroy the epidermis and dermis. The burn site appears white or charred black. There is no sensation in the area, because the nerve endings are destroyed.

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